Do you believe that your legacy systems are preventing digital transformation?

Posted on : 14-03-2019 | By : richard.gale | In : Data, Finance, FinTech, Innovation, Uncategorized

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According to the results of our recent Broadgate Futures Survey more than half of our clients agreed that digital transformation within their organisation was being hampered by legacy systems. Indeed, no one “strongly disagreed” confirming the extent of the problem.

Many comments suggested that this was not simply a case of budget constraints, but the sheer size, scale and complexity of the transition had deterred organisations in fear of the fact that they were not adequately equipped to deliver successful change.

Legacy systems have a heritage going back many years to the days of the mega mainframes of the 70’s and 80’s. This was a time when banks were the masters of technological innovation. We saw the birth of ATMs, BACS and international card payments. It was an exciting time of intense modernisation. Many of the core systems that run the finance sector today are the same ones that were built back then. The only problem is that, although these systems were built to last they were not built for change.

The new millennium experienced another significant development with the introduction of the internet, an opportunity the banks could have seized and considered developing new, simpler, more versatile systems. However, instead they decided to adopt a different strategy and modify their existing systems, in their eyes there was no need to reinvent the wheel. They made additions and modifications as and when required. As a result, most financial organisations have evolved over the decades into organisations of complex networks, a myriad of applications and an overloaded IT infrastructure.

The Bank of England itself has recently been severely reprimanded by a Commons Select Committee review who found the Bank to be drowning in out of date processes in dire need of modernisation. Its legacy systems are overly complicated and inefficient, following a merger with the PRA in 2014 their IT estate comprises of duplicated systems and extensive data overload.

Budget, as stated earlier is not the only factor in preventing digital transformation, although there is no doubt that these projects are expensive and extremely time consuming. The complexity of the task and the fear of failure is another reason why companies hold on to their legacy systems. Better the devil you know! Think back to the TSB outage (there were a few…), systems were down for hours and customers were unable to access their accounts following a system upgrade. The incident ultimately led to huge fines from the Financial Conduct Authority and the resignation of the Chief Executive.

For most organisations abandoning their legacy systems is simply not an option so they need to find ways to update in order to facilitate the connection to digital platforms and plug into new technologies.

Many of our clients believe that it is not the legacy system themselves which are the barrier, but it is the inability to access the vast amount of data which is stored in its infrastructure.  It is the data that is the key to the digital transformation, so accessing it is a crucial piece of the puzzle.

“It’s more about legacy architecture and lack of active management of data than specifically systems”

By finding a way to unlock the data inside these out of date systems, banks can decentralise their data making it available to the new digital world.

With the creation of such advancements as the cloud and API’s, it is possible to sit an agility layer between the existing legacy systems and newly adopted applications. HSBC has successfully adopted this approach and used an API strategy to expand its digital and mobile services without needing to replace its legacy systems.

Legacy systems are no longer the barrier to digital innovation that they once were. With some creative thinking and the adoption of new technologies legacy can continue to be part of your IT infrastructure in 2019!

https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/33529/bank-of-england-slammed-over-outdated-it-and-culture