Selecting a new “digitally focused” sourcing partner

Posted on : 18-07-2018 | By : john.vincent | In : Cloud, FinTech, Innovation, Uncategorized

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It was interesting to see the recent figures this month from the ISG Index, showing that the traditional outsourcing market in EMEA has rebounded. Figures for the second quarter for commercial outsourcing contracts show a combined annual contract value (ACV) of €3.7Bn. This is significantly up 23% on 2017 and for the traditional sourcing market, reverses a downward trend which had persisted for the previous four quarters.

This is an interesting change of direction, particularly against a backdrop of economic uncertainty around Brexit and the much “over indulged”, GDPR preparation. It seems that despite this, rather than hunkering down with a tin hat and stockpiling rations, companies in EMEA have invested in their technology service provision to support an agile digital growth for the future. The global number also accelerated, up 31% to a record ACV of €9.9Bn.

Underpinning some of these figures has been a huge acceleration in the As-a-Service market. In the last 2 years the ACV attributed to SaaS and IaaS has almost doubled. This has been fairly consistent across all sectors.

So when selecting a sourcing partner, what should companies consider outside of the usual criteria including size, capability, cultural fit, industry experience, flexibility, cost and so on?

One aspect that is interesting from these figures is the influence that technologies such as cloud based services, automation (including AI) and robotic process automation (RPA) are having both now and in the years to come. Many organisations have used sourcing models to fix costs and benefit from labour arbitrage as a pass-through from suppliers. Indeed, this shift of labour ownership has fuelled incredible growth within some of the service providers. For example, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) has grown from 45.7k employees in 2005 to 394k in March 2018.

However, having reached this heady number if staff, the technologies mentioned previously are threatening the model of some of these companies. As-a-Service providers such as Microsoft Azure and Amazon AWS have platforms now which are carving their way through technology service provision, which previously would have been managed by human beings.

In the infrastructure space commoditisation is well under way. Indeed, we predict that the within 3 years the build, configure and manage skills in areas such Windows and Linux platforms will be rarely in demand. DevOps models, and variants of, are moving at a rapid pace with tools to support spinning up platforms on demand to support application services now mainstream. Service providers often focus on their technology overlay “value add” in this space, with portals or orchestration products which can manage cloud services. However, the value of these is often questionable over direct access or through commercial 3rd party products.

Secondly, as we’ve discussed here before, technology advances in RPA, machine learning and AI are transforming service provision. This of course is not just in terms of business applications but also in terms of the underpinning services. This is translating itself into areas such as self-service Bots which can be queried by end users to provide solutions and guidance, or self-learning AI processes which can predict potential system failures before they occur and take preventative actions.

These advances present a challenge to the workforce focused outsource providers.

Given the factors above, and the market shift, it is important that companies take these into account when selecting a technology service provider. Questions to consider are;

  • What are their strategic relationships with cloud providers, and not just at the “corporate” level, but do they have in depth knowledge of the whole technology ecosystem at a low level?
  • Can they demonstrate skills in the orchestration and automation of platforms at an “infrastructure as a code” level?
  • Do they have capability to deliver process automation through techniques such as Bots, can they scale to enterprise and where are their RPA alliances?
  • Does the potential partner have domain expertise and open to partnership around new products and shared reward/JV models?

The traditional sourcing engagement models are evolving which has developed new opportunities on both sides. Expect new entrants, without the technical debt, organisational overheads and with a more technology solution focus to disrupt the market.

Welcoming Robots to the Team

Posted on : 30-05-2018 | By : richard.gale | In : Finance, FinTech, Innovation

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Research suggests that that the adoption of Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and AI technologies is set to double by 2019. This marks a fundamental change in how organisations work and the potential impact on employees should not be underestimated.

For many years we have seen robots on the factory floor where manual processes have been replaced by automation. This has drastically changed the nature of manufacturing and has inevitably led to a reduction in these workforces.  It is understandable therefore, that we can hear the trembling voices of city workers shouting, “the robots are coming!”

Robotic software should not be thought of as the enemy but rather as a friendly addition to the IT family.  A different approach is needed. If you were replacing an excel spreadsheet with a software program an employee would see this as advantage, as it makes their job quicker and easier to do, therefore welcome the change. Looking at RPA in the same way will change the way employees view its implementation and how they feel about it.

There is no doubt that in some cases RPA is intended as a cost saver but organisations that see RPA as simply a cost saving solution will reap the least rewards. For many companies who have already completed successful RPA programmes, the number one priority has been to eliminate repetitive work that employees didn’t want or need to do. Approaching an RPA project in a carefully thought out and strategic manner will provide results that show that RPA and employees can work together.

Successful transformation using RPA relies on an often used but very relevant phrase  “it’s all about the People Process and Technology”.  You need all three in the equation. It is undeniable that automation is a disruptive technology which will affect employees outlook and affect the way they work. Change management is key in managing these expectations. If robots are to be a part of your organisation, then your employees must be prepared and included.

Perhaps it’s time to demystify RPA, and see it for what is really is, just another piece of software! Automation is about making what you do easier to execute, with less mistakes and greater flexibility. It is important to demonstrate to your staff that RPA is part of a much wider strategic plan of growth and new opportunities.

It is vital to communicate with staff at every level, explaining the purpose of RPA and what it will mean for them. Ensure everyone understands the implications and the benefits of the transition to automation. Even though activities and relationships within an organisation may change this does not necessarily mean a change for the worst.

Employees must be involved from the start of the process. Those individuals who have previously performed the tasks to be automated will be your subject matter experts. You will need to train several existing employees in RPA to manage the process going forward.  Building an RPA team from current employees will ensure that you have their buy- in which is crucial if the implementation is to be a success.

With any new software training is often an afterthought. In the case of RPA training is more important than ever, ensuring that the robots and employees understand each other and can work efficiently together. Working to train RPA experts internally will result in a value-added proposition for the future when it comes to maintaining or scaling your solution.

When analysing the initial RPA requirements, a great deal of thought must be given to the employees who are being replaced and where their skills can be effectively be redeployed. Employee engagement increases when personnel feel that their contribution to the organisation is meaningful and widespread.

Consultation and collaboration throughout the entire process will help to ensure a smoother transition where everyone can feel the benefits. Following a successful RPA implementation share the results with everyone in your organisation.  Share the outcomes and what you have learnt, highlight those employees and teams that have helped along the way.

The robots are coming! They are here to help and at your service!

Are you ready to take advantage of Robotic Process Automation?

Posted on : 28-02-2018 | By : richard.gale | In : Innovation, Uncategorized

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Robotic Process Automation or RPA is growing fast. We were initially sceptical as to how innovative it actually is but are always looking for ways to help our clients (and Broadgate!) work more efficiently.

RPA technology, sometimes called a software robot or ‘bot’, mimics a human worker, logging into applications, entering data, calculating and completing tasks, and logging out.

RPA software isn’t really part of an organisation’s IT infrastructure. It sits above, enabling a company to implement the technology quickly and efficiently without changing the existing infrastructure and systems.

RPA could be seen as a ‘tactical’ approach to solving a business problem. In the long term the ‘bots’ should be replaced by strategic solutions but the advantages of quickly being able to make a process more efficient and remove human error can make immediate efficiency gains. And we all know how long these tactical solutions can remain in place….

The evolution of RPA

Although the term “robotic process automation” can be traced to the early 2000s, it had been developing for a number of years previously. We worked on screen scraping applications in the early ’90s to help turn ‘green screens’ into newly fashionable GUI applications.

RPA evolved from three key technologies: screen scraping (mimicking user interaction), workflow automation and artificial intelligence.

Screen scraping is the process of collecting screen display data from a legacy application so that the data can be displayed by a more modern user interface. The advantages of workflow automation software, which eliminates the need for manual data entry and increases order fulfilment rates, include increased speed, efficiency and accuracy. Lastly, artificial intelligence involves the ability of computer systems to perform tasks that normally require human intervention and intelligence.

Benefits of RPA

Robotic process automation technology can help organisations on their digital transformation stories by:

  • Creating cost savings for manual and repetitive tasks
  • Enabling employees to be more productive
  • Enabling better customer service
  • Ensuring business operations and processes comply with regulations and standards
  • Allowing processes to be completed much more rapidly
  • Providing improved efficiency by digitising and auditing processes

Applications of RPA

Some of the applications of RPA include:

  • Financial services: Companies in the financial services industry can use RPA for foreign exchange payments, automating account openings and closings, managing audit requests and processing insurance claims.
  • Customer service: RPA can help companies offer better customer service by automating call centre tasks, including verifying e-signatures, uploading scanned documents and verifying information for automatic approvals or rejections.
  • Accounting: Organisations can use RPA for general accounting, operational accounting, transactional reporting and budgeting.
  • Supply Chain:  RPA can be used for procurement, automating order processing and payments, monitoring inventory levels and tracking shipments.
  • Healthcare: Medical organizations can use RPA for handling patient records, claims, customer support, account management, billing, reporting and analytics.
  • Human resources: RPA can automate HR tasks, including onboarding and offboarding, updating employee information and timesheet submission processes.

 

What’s so different from regular automation?

What distinguishes RPA from traditional IT automation is the ability of the RPA software to be aware and adapt to changing circumstances, exceptions and new situations.
Once RPA software has been trained to capture and interpret the actions of specific processes in existing software applications, it can then manipulate data, trigger responses, initiate new actions and communicate with other systems autonomously.
RPA software is particularly useful for organisations that have many different and complicated systems that need to interact together fluidly.
For instance, if an electronic form from a Compliance system (such as know your customer) is missing a postcode, traditional automation software would flag the form as having an exception and an employee would handle the exception by looking up the correct postcode and entering it on the form. Once the form is complete, the employee might send it on to Compliance so the information can be entered into the approved customer system.
With RPA technology, however, software that has the ability to adapt, self-learn and self-correct would handle the exception and interact with the payroll system without human assistance.

What to look for in RPA software

When enterprise leaders look for RPA technologies, they should consider a number of things, including:

  • Simplicity: Organisations should look for products that are simple enough that any employee in the business can build and use them to handle various kinds of work, including collecting data and turning content into information that enables leaders to make the best business decisions.
  • Speed: Enterprises should be able to design and test new robotic processes in a few hours or less, as well as optimise the bots to work quickly.
  • Reliability: As companies launch robots to automate hundreds or even thousands of tasks, they should look for tools with built-in monitoring and analytics that enable them to monitor the health of their systems.
  • Intelligence: The best RPA tools can support simple task-based activities, read and write to any data source, and take advantage of more advanced learning to further improve automation.
  • Scalability: Organisations shouldn’t select RPA software that requires them to deploy software robots to desktops or virtualised environments. They should look for RPA platforms that can be centrally managed and scale massively.
  • Enterprise-class: Companies should look for tools that are built from the ground up for enterprise-grade scalability, reliability and manageability.

Prerequisites for robotic process automation

  1. Are you able to describe the work? This doesn’t mean your documentation exists or is current. The task could be described by recording a user performing their work on a computer including how they handle exceptions.
  2. Is the work rules-based rather than subjective? Robots need to be prepared (aka, taught, trained, configured) to perform specific actions on your systems. Current technology is insufficient for a robot to determine on its own what to when faced with a new situation.
  3. Is the work performed electronically? It doesn’t matter how many different applications are required or whether they are in-house, cloud-based, Citrix, desktop or mainframe.
  4. Is the required data structured (or could it be structured)? If not, you may be able to utilise an OCR and/or cognitive application capable of structuring the file.  Alternatively, you could have people enter the data into a structured format.

Disqualifiers for robotic process automation use cases​​

  1. Process stability. If your organisation keeps changing the process (e.g., responding to competitive factors or new sources of information), then it may not be the right time to automate it. Despite investing resources to stabilise the current activity, you may end up with too much maintenance to keep your automation aligned to business needs.
  2. Target applications suitability. Some applications are harder for robots to use than others. It’s a fact that vendors don’t really like to highlight in the sales process. Starting with an especially challenging target application could delay the whole program, cause fatigue in leadership and put your credibility at risk. If you have to do it, make sure that you build in an accurate view of the time required.

Organisational impacts of RPA

Though automation software is expected to replace up to 120 million full-time employees worldwide by 2024, many high-quality jobs will be created for those who maintain and improve RPA software.

When software robots do replace people in the enterprise, managers need to be responsible for ensuring that business outcomes are achieved and new governance policies are met.

Robotic process automation technology also requires that the CIO take more of a leadership role and assume accountability for the business outcomes and the risks of deploying RPA tools.

Additionally, the COO, CIO and HR, as well as the relevant executive who owns the process being automated, should all work toward ensuring the availability of an enterprise-grade, secure platform for controlling and operating bots across systems.

Where the robotic process automation market is heading

One report expects the RPA market to reach $5 billion by 2024. The increased adoption of RPA technologies by organisations to enhance their capabilities and performance and boost cost savings will reportedly drive the growth of the robotic process automation market most during that time.

We are excited that the mix of technologies and domain business expertise will enable this growth and we are focusing on growing our skills in this area.

Be aware of “AI Washing”

Posted on : 26-01-2018 | By : john.vincent | In : Cloud, Data, General News, Innovation

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I checked and it’s almost 5 years ago now that we wrote about the journey to cloud and mentioned “cloud washing“, the process by which technology providers were re-positioning previous offerings to be “cloud enabled”, “cloud ready” and the like.

Of course, the temptation to do this is natural. After all, if the general public can trigger a 200% increase in share price simply by re-branding your iced tea company to “Long Blockchain“, then why not.

And so we enter another “washing” phase, this time in the form of a surge in Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered technologies. As the enterprise interest in AI and machine learning gathers pace, software vendors are falling over each other to meet the market demands.

Indeed, according to Gartner by 2020;

AI technologies will be virtually pervasive in almost every new software product and service

This is great news and the speed of change is outstanding. However, it does pose some challenges for technology leaders and decision makers as the hype continues.

Firstly, we need to apply the “so what?” test against the claims of AI enablement. The fact that a product has AI capabilities doesn’t propel it automatically to the top of selection criteria. It needs to be coupled with a true business value rather than simply a sales and marketing tool.

Whilst that sounds obvious, before you cry “pass me another egg Vincent”, it does warrant a pause and reflection. Human behaviour and the pressures on generating business value against a more difficult backdrop can easier drive a penchant for the latest trend (anyone seen “GDPR compliant” monikers appearing?)

In terms of the bandwagon jumping, Gartner says;

Similar to greenwashing, in which companies exaggerate the environmental-friendliness of their products or practices for business benefit, many technology vendors are now “AI washing” by applying the AI label a little too indiscriminately

The second point, is to ask the question “Is this really AI or Automation?”. I’ve sat in a number of vendor presentations through 2017 where I asked exactly that. After much deliberation, pontification and several “well umms” we agreed that it was actually the latter we were discussing. Indeed, there terms are often interchanged at will during pitches which can be somewhat disconcerting.

The thing is, Automation doesn’t have the “blade runner-esc” cachet of AI, which conjures up the usual visions that the film industry has imprinted on our minds (of course, to counter this we’ve now got Robotic Process Automation!)

So what’s the difference between AI and Automation? The basic definition is;

  • Automation is software that follows pre-programmed ‘rules’.
  • Artificial intelligence is designed to simulate human thinking.

Automation is everywhere and been an important part of industry for decades. It enables machines to perform repetitive, monotonous tasks thus freeing up time for human beings to focus on the activities that require more reasoning, rationale and personal touch. This drives efficiency and a more productive and efficient business and personal life.

The difference with Automation is that is requires manual configuration and set up. It is smart, but it has to follow set instructions and workflow.

AI however is not developed simply to follow a set of predefined instructions. It is designed to mimic human behaviour to continuously seek patterns, learn from it data and “experiences” and determine the appropriate course of action or responses based on these parameters. This all comes under the general heading of “machine learning”.

The common “fuel” that drives both Automation and AI is Data. It is the lifeblood of the organisation and we now live is an environment where we talk about “data driven” technologies at the centre of the enterprise.

Whilst it’s hard to ignore all the hype around AI it is important for decision makers to think carefully not only in terms of what they want to achieve, but also how to filter out the “AI washing”.

The 2018 Broadgate Predictions

Posted on : 19-12-2017 | By : richard.gale | In : Predictions

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Battle of the Chiefs

Chief Information Officer 1 –  Chief Digital Officer 0

Digital has been the interloper into the world of IT – originating from the Marketing Department through the medium of Website morphing into Ecommerce. The result was more budget and so power with the CDiO than the CIO and the two Chiefs have been rubbing along uncomfortably together, neither fully understanding the boundaries between them. 2018 will see the re-emergence of CIO empire as technology becomes more service based (Cloud, SaaS, Microservices etc) and focus returns to delivering high paced successful transformational change.

 

Battle of the Algorithms

Quantum 2 – Security 1

All the major Tech companies now have virtual Quantum computers available (so the toolkits if not the technology). These allow adventurous techies to experiment with Quantum concepts. Who knows what the capabilities are of Quantum but through its enormous processing power it will have the capability to look at every possible combination of events for a giving situation at once. That is great in terms of deciding which share to buy or how people interacting on Facebook but it will also have the potential to crack most current encryption mechanisms. Saying that it will enable another level of secure access too!

 

Battle of the Search Engines

Voice 2 – Screen 0

OK Google, Alexa, Siri…. There’s a great video of Google talking to Alexa on infinite loop. That’s all fun but in 2018 Voice will start to become a dominant force for search and for general utility. Effectively stopping what you are doing and typing in a command or search will start to feel a little strange and old-fashioned. OK in the office we may not all start shouting at our computers (well not more than normal) but around the home, car using our phones it is the obvious way to interact. This trend is already gathering momentum. VR and especially AR will add to this, the main thing holding it back is the fact you look like an idiot with the headset on. Once that is cracked then there will be no stopping it.

 

RoboWars – to be continued…

Robots 1 – People 1

AI and ‘robot process automation’ RPA are everywhere. Every services firm worth its salt has process automation plans and the hype around companies such as Blue Prisim is phenomenal.  This is all very exciting and many doomsayers have been predicting the end of most jobs (and some the end of most people!). Yes. Automation of processes is here. It’s been here for years – that is what most ERP (aka workflow) systems do. It makes absolute sense to automate mundane processes and if you can build in a bit of intelligence to deal with slight differences in the pattern then all the better. Will it result in the loss of millions of jobs… well maybe and probably in the short-term but once again, as every time in the past, technology will replace human endeavour whilst humans will be busy building the next creative, innovative wave.

 

The Lightbulb Moment

Internet 1 – Internet of Things 3

Is there anything left which is not internet connected? Two years ago, there were very few people that had any interest in communicating with a lightbulb – apart from flicking a light-switch. Now IoT connected lightbulbs appear be everywhere and the trend will grow and grow. The speed this happening is accelerating and the scope of connected devices is expanding beyond belief. Who would have thought we needed a smart hairbrush? This is all fine and will enrich our lives in ways we probably haven’t even thought about yet but there is a cost. We are allowing these devices to listen, see, control parts of our lives and the data they gather has value both for good and bad reasons. There is no ‘culture of security’ for IoT. Many of the devices are cheaply designed and manufactured with no thought towards security or data privacy. We are allowing these devices into our lives and we don’t really know what they know and who knows what they know. This may be a subtler change for 2018 – the securing of ‘the Thing’ – well lets hope so!

 

Welcome to our ESports Day

Call Of Duty 2 – Premiership Football 1

Sport is a big business. From Curling to Swimming to Indy Car racing it has a thousand differing forms, millions of participants and billions of armchair viewers. Top class athletes in a popular sport can earn millions of dollars a year both from performing and through product endorsements.

Video games have been popular for years. They started as single, two player games and now are worldwide multiplayer extravaganzas where you can battle, race or fight against people throughout the world. A number of superstars or EAthletes have emerged, first through winning competitions and then through youtube etc where their tournaments are recorded and watched again and again. This business has now broken the $1B mark – still way off ‘real’ sport but its growing massively and some point soon will become part of the mainstream.

Featured Tech Startup – Interview With Allan Martinson, Starship Robots

Posted on : 26-04-2016 | By : Maria Motyka | In : 5 Minutes With, Cyber Security, Featured Startup, General News, Innovation, IoT

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What is it like to be part of a startup which brings robots to life (and to the streets of London)?

Our robots have been named #4 most anticipated tech product of 2016, right after Apple’s new iPhone. It is totally awesome!!! I have been part of many companies in my life but this one has completely spoiled me. It is such a ride.

 

starship woww

 

Starship Robots was featured in Forbes’ first episode of ‘The Premise’ tech podcast, during which one of the co-founders of Starship noted that the delivery industry is the largest undisrupted industry in the world and stated that “Millions of parcels are being delivered every day in a wasteful manner and its possible to automate this using today’s technology”. Could you please expand on this?

In EU and US alone the delivery firms carry 25 billion packages a year, plus we are doing 130 billion shopping trips on our cars. There is absolutely no point of moving a 2 or 7 ton gas-guzzling vehicle to bring somebody a few kilos of deliveries. You better put wheels to this package or bag and let it roll to you, with 0 emissions, 0 noise, 0 road congestion.

An average family loses an hour per day on shopping trips. We have a mission of giving people this 1 hour back. You can do your own math how many billions of hours we could release.

 

What do you consider as the most interesting insight you have learnt during Starship Robots’ trials? How prepared are consumers for their adoption?

People are MUCH more friendly towards those devices than we ever thought. And absolute majority takes them as the most natural thing on Earth.

 

starshipp

 

Each of Starship’s innocent-looking robots is equipped with 9 cameras, providing you with a 360 perspective. How would you respond to concerns over data privacy linked to what some could consider the introduction of surveillance machines to the streets and people’s doorsteps?

What is the difference between a driven looking at surroundings through the car’s window and our operator (potentially) looking at the sidewalk through cameras? Nothing. Following your logic, we should drive cars with closed eyes 🙂

 

As someone working in new tech, how do you imagine European metropolises in 10, 20 years?

European cities in 20 years will have self-driving cars and around 3 delivery robot per each such car. That is not a joke but based on our calculation on transportation needs.

 

When can we expect a launch of Starship Robots?

We expect a full launch in 2017. BTW We are looking for a name for the robot and feel free to submit ideas on www.starship.xyz.

Is a robot also in line for your next interview?

Posted on : 26-02-2016 | By : Maria Motyka | In : Innovation, Uncategorized

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The consignment to history of what were key jobs at the time is, of course, a natural consequence of technological advancement (see our previous article on the future resource market). Replaced by ‘new’ tech of the time, everything from switchboard and elevator operators to “ice cutters” have their place in the list of professions which have long since left our daily job boards.

Nevertheless, over the past few years there has been an increased amount of coverage given to the consequences of new tech and the 4th Industrial Revolution (including by leaders at last month’s World Economic Forum), which is said to lead to jobs currently held by men and women becoming filled by machines in pretty much every sector and industry in the global economy.

Thomas Frey, Senior Futurist at the DaVinci Institute, and Google’s top rated Futurist Speaker, predicts that by 2030 a whopping 2 billion jobs will no longer exist (to put that in context… around half of all the jobs on the planet). Does this mean that we have a 50 per cent chance of becoming jobless within the next few decades, because of automation and other new technologies, such as robots being introduced?

robot

Worry not!…apparently the answer is no.

According to Frey, what it means is that our jobs are transitioning, and it is happening “at a higher pace than ever before in history”. The futurist stresses that due to their catalytic nature, several innovations, including driver-less cars, teacher-less education and 3D-printable houses, are actually going to create completely new industries. This view is supported by a recent report, Fast Forward 2030: The Future of Work and the Workplace, which states that;

“Losing occupations does not necessarily mean losing jobs – just changing what people do”, and by Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, Jonathan Grudin, who said that “Technology will continue to disrupt jobs, but more jobs seem likely to be created”

As an example, let’s take 3D printing, which Chris Anderson, Managing Editor of Wired Magazine believes to be even bigger than the Internet. Frey predicts, that as 3D printing matures, professions such as clothing manufacturing and retailing, as well as lumber, rock, drywall, shingle and concrete industries are going to disappear. However, new jobs will become available in the areas of 3D printer design, engineering and manufacturing (although, in one scenario a 3D printer can print a baby 3D printer); there will be a demand for 3D printer repairmen, product designers, stylists, engineers and ‘ink’ sellers.

While predicting that even though robots will fill some jobs, others will benefit from this productivity growth and subsequently will have more income and more disposable income. This in turn will increase the need for other jobs. Heidi Shierholz, Chief Economist at the U.S. Labor Department, implies that the pace of change might at times be exaggerated. During the Will your Job Disappear by 2024? Bloomberg Benchmark podcast she stated that actually we are not seeing a massive acceleration in productivity, which would signal that robots and automation have some way to go in removing the levels of workforce that some are predicting. Indeed, while historically productivity has grown around 2 per cent a year, over the last 10 years it has actually been a little bit slower.

Are we being over dramatic about the speed of the changes leading to an increased man vs machine conflict in the workplace? All we can say for certain is that whilst the more extreme scenarios are increasingly likely to make headlines and reach your feeds, it is certain that sooner or later technology will change your job and those of the next generation.