Broadgate 2013 Predictions – how did we do?

Posted on : 30-12-2013 | By : richard.gale | In : Innovation

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In December 2012 we identified some themes we thought would be important for the coming year. Let’s see how we got on…

1. Infrastructure Services continue to commoditise – for many organisations, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is now mainstream. Technology advancement will continue to move the underlying infrastructure more towards a utility model and reduce costs in terms of software, hardware and resource.

This has happened and is continuing to grow, most organisations have the infrastructure in place to support IaaS with private clouds and virtualised environments. However, the flexibility and agility benefits have not always been realised as large organisation IaaS have sometimes been weighed down with the legacy change and build processes of the previous model. To circumvent this, many businesses are looking at public cloud for more flexible capacity. This will be the big growth area of 2014 especially with financial services organisations that, previously, have been hesitant in adopting public cloud solutions.

2. Application/Platform rationalisation – for many large firms there is still a large amount of legacy cost in terms of both disparate platforms, often aligned by business unit, and their sheer size/complexity. The next year will see an increase in rationalisation of application platforms to drive operational efficiency.

In 2013 the understanding and scale of the problem became more apparent but, with limited change/transformation budgets (in financial services mainly due to the burden of regulatory compliance requirements) not much action. Now these complex webs of legacy applications are starting to fail and seriously constrained business growth. 2014 will be a ‘crunch’ year when these expensive problems have to be tackled head on either through wholesale re-architecting or giving someone else the problem of running them whilst new solutions are built.

3. Big Data/ Data Science grows and market starts to consolidate – 2012 was the year that Big Data technologies went mainstream…2013 will see an increased focus on Data Science resource and technology to maximise the analytical value. There will also be some consolidation at the infrastructure product level.

In financial services we saw a fair amount of discussion, some large proof of concept projects focusing on consolidation (many seem to be targeting the risk and finance areas), but not the levels of take up we expected. MasterCard have come in with a big data restaurant review concept. We may have been slightly premature with this one. We think the understanding of Data Science is starting to go mainstream and, as with Cloud, the demand will come more from the business rather than IT architects in 2014.

4. Data Centre/Hosting providers continue growth – fewer and fewer companies are talking about building their own data centres now, even the very large ones. With the focus on core business value, infrastructure will continue to be hosted externally driving up the need for provider compute power.

 Many organisations either use external more flexible hosting solutions or have an excess of capacity in their existing data centres. This will continue and grow in pace in 2014.

5. More rationalisation of IT organisations – 2012 saw large reductions in operational workforce, particularly in financial services. With revenues under more pressure this year (and in line with point 1) we will see further reductions in resource capacity and relocation to low cost locations, both nearshore and within the UK.

In the financial services sector this may be at an end. There will be growth in demand for IT skills in 2014 but there will be some reductions particularly in the infrastructure/BAU space due to the continued commoditisation of technology and move to XaaS services.

6. Crowd-funding services continue to gain market share – there have been many new entrants to this space over recent years with companies such as Funding Circle, Thin-Cats, Bank-to-the-Future and Kickstarter all doing well. We see this continuing to grow as access to funds from traditional lenders is still hard. The question is at what point will they step in.

This one was an easy prediction as a low starting point combined with the banks reluctance to lend, low interest rates and increasing interest in the tech sector inevitably led to high levels of growth. 2014 will continue this trend but with a higher degree of regulation after the first high profile failure of a lending exchange…

7. ‘Instant’ Returns on investment required – growth of SaaS & BYOD is changing the perception of technology. People as consumers are now accustomed to an instant solution to a problem (by downloading an app or purchasing a service with a credit card). This, combined with historic patchy project successes, means that long lead-time projects are becoming harder to justify; IT departments are having to find near instant solutions to business problems.

Business users are leading IT departments on the adoption of SaaS in particular. IT is playing catch-up and the race will continue. We are not sure what 2014 will bring on this. It could be that IT departments regain control or, alternatively, are bypassed on a more frequent basis by impatient, IT savvy business users.

8. Technology Talent Wars – with start-ups disrupting traditional players in areas such as data analytics, social media and mobile payment apps, barriers to entry eroding and salaries on the rise we see a shift from talent wanting to join industries such as financial services and choosing new technology companies.

Relatively low demand from financial services firms (except for a few specific skills such as security) has deferred this. This is more likely to impact 2014 change and innovation programmes now.

9. Samsung/Android gain more ground over Apple – we already have seen the Apple dominance, specifically in relation to the Appstore, being eroded and this will continue as the potential of a more open platform becomes apparent to both developers and users of technology.

This has happened and will continue unless Apple can come up with some new magic. Phones/tablets are the new battleground, other operating systems such as Windows and potentially Jolla could disrupt the trend in 2014.

10. The death knell sounds for RIM/Blackberry – not much more to say. Most likely they will be acquired by one of the big new technology companies to gain access to the remaining smart phone users.

The only thing to add to this is that there may be a ‘dead-cat’ bounce for Blackberry in 2014.

 

Once again we hope you have enjoyed our monthly articles and have had a successful 2013. We wish you all the same for 2014!

 

Broadgate Predicts 2013 – Survey Results

Posted on : 27-03-2013 | By : jo.rose | In : Data, Finance, General News, Innovation, IoT

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In January we surveyed our clients, colleagues and partners against our predictions for 2013. We are pleased that we have now the results, the highlights of which are included below.

Key Messages

Infrastructure as a Service, Cloud and a shift to Data Centre & Hosted Services scored the highest, outlining the move from on-premise to a more utility based compute model.

Strategies to rationalise apps, infrastructure and organisations remains high on the priority list. However, removing the technology burden built over many years is proving difficult.

Many commented on the current financial constraints within organisations and the impact to the predictions in terms of technology advancement.

Response Breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of the total responses received, the vast majority concurred with the predictions for 2013. A total of 78% either “Agreed” or “Strongly Agreed” (broadly in line with the 2012 survey).

Ranking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The diagram above shows the results in order from highest scoring to lowest. The continued growth in Infrastructure as a Service had the top overall ranking with 91% and the least was Crowd-funding with 53% agreement.

Respondents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We sent our predictions out to over 700 of our clients and associates. Unlike our previous years’ survey, we wanted to get feedback from all levels and functions, so alongside CIOs, COOs and technology leaders we also surveyed SMEs on both the buy and sell side of service delivery organisations.

We would like to thank all respondents for their input and particularly for the many that provided additional insight and commentary.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please email jo.rose@broadgateconsultants.com.