Has the agile product delivery model has been too widely adopted?

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As a consultancy, we have the benefit of working with many clients across almost all industry verticals. Specifically, over the last 7-8 years we have seen a huge uptake in the shift from traditional project delivery models towards more agile techniques.

The combination of people, process and technology with this delivery model has been hugely beneficial in increasing both the speed of execution and alignment of business requirements with products. That said, in more recent years we have observed an almost “religious like” adoption of agile often, in our view, at the expense of pragmatism and execution focus. A purist approach to agile—where traditional development is completely replaced in one fell swoop— results in failure for many organisations, especially those that rely on tight controls, rigid structures and cost-benefit analysis.

Despite its advantages, many organisations struggle to successfully transition to agile, leading to an unnecessarily high agile project failure rate. While there are several common causes for this failure rate, one of the top causes—if not the leading cause—is the lack of an agile-ready culture.

This has been evident with our own client discussions which have centred around “organisational culture at odds with agile values” and “lack of business customer or product owner availability” as challenges for adopting and scaling agile.  Agile as a methodology does require a corresponding agile culture to ensure success.  It’s no good committing to implementing in an agile way when the organisation is anything but agile!

Doing Agile v Being Agile

Adopting an Agile methodology in an organisation which has not fully embraced Agile can still reap results (various estimates but benchmark around a 20% increase in benefits). If, on the other hand, the firm has truly embraced an agile approach in the organisation from CEO to receptionist then the sky is the limit and improvements of 200% plus have been experienced!

Investing in the change management required to build an agile culture is the key to making a successful transition to agile and experiencing all of the competitive advantages it affords. Through this investment, your business leadership, IT leadership and IT teams can align, collaborate and deliver quality solutions for customers, as well as drive organisational transformation—both today and into the future.

There are certain projects, where shoehorning them into agile processes just serves to slow down the delivery with no benefit. Some of this may come from the increase in devops delivery but we see it stifling many infrastructure or underpinning projects, which still lend themselves to a more waterfall delivery approach.

The main difference between agile methodologies and waterfall methodologies is the phased approach that waterfall takes (define requirements, freeze requirements, begin coding, move to testing, etc.) as opposed to the iterative approach of agile. However, there are different ways to implement a waterfall methodology, including iterative waterfall, which still practices the phased approach but delivers in smaller release cycles.

Today, more and more teams would say that they are using an agile methodology. When in fact, many of those teams are likely to be using a hybrid model that includes elements of several agile methodologies as well as waterfall.

It is crucial to bring together people, processes and technologies and identify where it makes business sense to implement agile; agile is not a silver bullet. An assessment of the areas where agile would work best is required, which will then guide the transition. Many organisations kick off an agile project without carrying out this assessment and find following this path is just too difficult. A well-defined transitional approach is a prerequisite for success.

We all understand that today’s business units need to be flexible and agile to survive but following an agile delivery model is not always the only solution.

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Posted on : 30-01-2019 | By : richard.gale | In : Uncategorized

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