What will the IT department look like in the future?

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We are going through a significant change in how technology services are delivered as we stride further into the latest phase of the Digital Revolution. The internet provided the starting pistol for this phase and now access to new technology, data and services is accelerating at breakneck speed.

More recently the real enablers of a more agile and service-based technology have been the introduction of virtualisation and orchestration technologies which allowed for compute to be tapped into on demand and removed the friction between software and hardware.

The impact of this cannot be underestimated. The removal of the needed to manually configure and provision new compute environments was a huge step forwards, and one which continues with developments in Infrastructure as Code (“IaC”), micro services and server-less technology.

However, whilst these technologies continually disrupt the market, the corresponding changes to the overall operating models has in our view lagged (this is particularly true in larger organisations which have struggled to shift from the old to the new).

If you take a peek into organisation structures today they often still resemble those of the late 90’s where capabilities in infrastructure were organised by specialists such as data centre, storage, service management, application support etc. There have been changes, specifically more recently with the shift to devops and continuous integration and development, but there is still a long way go.

Our recent Technology Futures Survey provided a great insight into how our clients (290) are responding to the shifting technology services landscape.

“What will your IT department look like in 5-7 years’ time?”

There were no surprises in the large majority of respondents agreeing that the organisation would look different in the near future. The big shift is to a more service focused, vendor led technology model, with between 53%-65% believing that this is the direction of travel.

One surprise was a relatively low consensus on the impact that Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) would have on management of live services, with only 10% saying it would be very likely. However, the providers of technology and services formed a smaller proportion of our respondents (28%) and naturally were more positive about the impact of AI.

The Broadgate view is that the changing shape of digital service delivery is challenging previous models and applying tension to organisations and providers alike.  There are two main areas where we see this;

  1. With the shift to cloud based and on-demand services, the need for any provider, whether internal or external, has diminished
  2. Automation, AI and machine learning are developing new capabilities in self-managing technology services

We expect that the technology organisation will shift to focus more on business products and procuring the best fit service providers. Central to this is AI and ML which, where truly intelligent (and not just marketing), can create a self-healing and dynamic compute capability with limited human intervention.

Cloud, machine learning and RPA will remove much of the need to manage and develop code

To really understand how the organisation model is shifting, we have to look at the impact that technology is having the on the whole supply chain. We’ve long outsourced the delivery of services. However, if we look the traditional service providers (IBM, DXC, TCS, Cognizant etc.) that in the first instance acted as brokers to this new digital technology innovations we see that they are increasingly being disintermediated, with provisioning and management now directly in the hands of the consumer.

Companies like Microsoft, Google and Amazon have superior technical expertise and they are continuing to expose these directly to the end consumer. Thus, the IT department needs to think less about how to either build or procure from a third party, but more how to build a framework of services which “knits together” a service model which can best meet their business needs with a layered, end-to-end approach. This fits perfectly with a more business product centric approach.

We don’t see an increase for in-house technology footprints with maybe the exception of truly data driven organisations or tech companies themselves.

In our results, the removal of cyber security issues was endorsed by 28% with a further 41% believing that this was a possible outcome. This represents a leap of faith given the current battle that organisations are undertaking to combat data breaches! Broadgate expect that organisations will increasingly shift the management of these security risks to third party providers, with telecommunication carriers also taking more responsibilities over time.

As the results suggest, the commercial and vendor management aspects of the IT department will become more important. This is often a skill which is absent in current companies, so a conscious strategy to develop capability is needed.

Organisations should update their operating model to reflect the changing shape of technology services, with the closer alignment of products and services to technology provision never being as important as it is today.

Indeed, our view is that even if your model serves you well today, by 2022 it is likely to look fairly stale. This is because what your company currently offers to your customers is almost certain to change, which will require fundamental re-engineering across, and around, the entire IT stack.

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Posted on : 29-01-2019 | By : john.vincent | In : Cloud, Data, General News, Innovation

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