Has the agile product delivery model has been too widely adopted?

Posted on : 30-01-2019 | By : richard.gale | In : Uncategorized

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As a consultancy, we have the benefit of working with many clients across almost all industry verticals. Specifically, over the last 7-8 years we have seen a huge uptake in the shift from traditional project delivery models towards more agile techniques.

The combination of people, process and technology with this delivery model has been hugely beneficial in increasing both the speed of execution and alignment of business requirements with products. That said, in more recent years we have observed an almost “religious like” adoption of agile often, in our view, at the expense of pragmatism and execution focus. A purist approach to agile—where traditional development is completely replaced in one fell swoop— results in failure for many organisations, especially those that rely on tight controls, rigid structures and cost-benefit analysis.

Despite its advantages, many organisations struggle to successfully transition to agile, leading to an unnecessarily high agile project failure rate. While there are several common causes for this failure rate, one of the top causes—if not the leading cause—is the lack of an agile-ready culture.

This has been evident with our own client discussions which have centred around “organisational culture at odds with agile values” and “lack of business customer or product owner availability” as challenges for adopting and scaling agile.  Agile as a methodology does require a corresponding agile culture to ensure success.  It’s no good committing to implementing in an agile way when the organisation is anything but agile!

Doing Agile v Being Agile

Adopting an Agile methodology in an organisation which has not fully embraced Agile can still reap results (various estimates but benchmark around a 20% increase in benefits). If, on the other hand, the firm has truly embraced an agile approach in the organisation from CEO to receptionist then the sky is the limit and improvements of 200% plus have been experienced!

Investing in the change management required to build an agile culture is the key to making a successful transition to agile and experiencing all of the competitive advantages it affords. Through this investment, your business leadership, IT leadership and IT teams can align, collaborate and deliver quality solutions for customers, as well as drive organisational transformation—both today and into the future.

There are certain projects, where shoehorning them into agile processes just serves to slow down the delivery with no benefit. Some of this may come from the increase in devops delivery but we see it stifling many infrastructure or underpinning projects, which still lend themselves to a more waterfall delivery approach.

The main difference between agile methodologies and waterfall methodologies is the phased approach that waterfall takes (define requirements, freeze requirements, begin coding, move to testing, etc.) as opposed to the iterative approach of agile. However, there are different ways to implement a waterfall methodology, including iterative waterfall, which still practices the phased approach but delivers in smaller release cycles.

Today, more and more teams would say that they are using an agile methodology. When in fact, many of those teams are likely to be using a hybrid model that includes elements of several agile methodologies as well as waterfall.

It is crucial to bring together people, processes and technologies and identify where it makes business sense to implement agile; agile is not a silver bullet. An assessment of the areas where agile would work best is required, which will then guide the transition. Many organisations kick off an agile project without carrying out this assessment and find following this path is just too difficult. A well-defined transitional approach is a prerequisite for success.

We all understand that today’s business units need to be flexible and agile to survive but following an agile delivery model is not always the only solution.

What will the IT department look like in the future?

Posted on : 29-01-2019 | By : john.vincent | In : Cloud, Data, General News, Innovation

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We are going through a significant change in how technology services are delivered as we stride further into the latest phase of the Digital Revolution. The internet provided the starting pistol for this phase and now access to new technology, data and services is accelerating at breakneck speed.

More recently the real enablers of a more agile and service-based technology have been the introduction of virtualisation and orchestration technologies which allowed for compute to be tapped into on demand and removed the friction between software and hardware.

The impact of this cannot be underestimated. The removal of the needed to manually configure and provision new compute environments was a huge step forwards, and one which continues with developments in Infrastructure as Code (“IaC”), micro services and server-less technology.

However, whilst these technologies continually disrupt the market, the corresponding changes to the overall operating models has in our view lagged (this is particularly true in larger organisations which have struggled to shift from the old to the new).

If you take a peek into organisation structures today they often still resemble those of the late 90’s where capabilities in infrastructure were organised by specialists such as data centre, storage, service management, application support etc. There have been changes, specifically more recently with the shift to devops and continuous integration and development, but there is still a long way go.

Our recent Technology Futures Survey provided a great insight into how our clients (290) are responding to the shifting technology services landscape.

“What will your IT department look like in 5-7 years’ time?”

There were no surprises in the large majority of respondents agreeing that the organisation would look different in the near future. The big shift is to a more service focused, vendor led technology model, with between 53%-65% believing that this is the direction of travel.

One surprise was a relatively low consensus on the impact that Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) would have on management of live services, with only 10% saying it would be very likely. However, the providers of technology and services formed a smaller proportion of our respondents (28%) and naturally were more positive about the impact of AI.

The Broadgate view is that the changing shape of digital service delivery is challenging previous models and applying tension to organisations and providers alike.  There are two main areas where we see this;

  1. With the shift to cloud based and on-demand services, the need for any provider, whether internal or external, has diminished
  2. Automation, AI and machine learning are developing new capabilities in self-managing technology services

We expect that the technology organisation will shift to focus more on business products and procuring the best fit service providers. Central to this is AI and ML which, where truly intelligent (and not just marketing), can create a self-healing and dynamic compute capability with limited human intervention.

Cloud, machine learning and RPA will remove much of the need to manage and develop code

To really understand how the organisation model is shifting, we have to look at the impact that technology is having the on the whole supply chain. We’ve long outsourced the delivery of services. However, if we look the traditional service providers (IBM, DXC, TCS, Cognizant etc.) that in the first instance acted as brokers to this new digital technology innovations we see that they are increasingly being disintermediated, with provisioning and management now directly in the hands of the consumer.

Companies like Microsoft, Google and Amazon have superior technical expertise and they are continuing to expose these directly to the end consumer. Thus, the IT department needs to think less about how to either build or procure from a third party, but more how to build a framework of services which “knits together” a service model which can best meet their business needs with a layered, end-to-end approach. This fits perfectly with a more business product centric approach.

We don’t see an increase for in-house technology footprints with maybe the exception of truly data driven organisations or tech companies themselves.

In our results, the removal of cyber security issues was endorsed by 28% with a further 41% believing that this was a possible outcome. This represents a leap of faith given the current battle that organisations are undertaking to combat data breaches! Broadgate expect that organisations will increasingly shift the management of these security risks to third party providers, with telecommunication carriers also taking more responsibilities over time.

As the results suggest, the commercial and vendor management aspects of the IT department will become more important. This is often a skill which is absent in current companies, so a conscious strategy to develop capability is needed.

Organisations should update their operating model to reflect the changing shape of technology services, with the closer alignment of products and services to technology provision never being as important as it is today.

Indeed, our view is that even if your model serves you well today, by 2022 it is likely to look fairly stale. This is because what your company currently offers to your customers is almost certain to change, which will require fundamental re-engineering across, and around, the entire IT stack.

The Challenges of Implementing Robotic Process Automation (RPA)

Posted on : 25-01-2019 | By : kerry.housley | In : Innovation, Uncategorized

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We recently surveyed our clients on their views around the future of technology in the workplace and the changes that they think are likely to shape their future working environment. 

One of the questions identified by many clients as a major challenge was around the adoption of RPA. We asked the question; 

“Do You Agree that RPA could improve the Efficiency of Your Business? 

Around 65% of the respondents to our survey agreed that RPA could improve the efficiency of their business, but many commented that they were put off by the challenges that needed to be overcome in order for RPA deployment to be a success. 

“The challenge is being able to identify how and where RPA is best deployed, avoiding any detrimental disruption 

In this article we will discuss in more detail the challenges, and what steps can be taken to ensure a more successful outcome. 

The benefits of RPA are:

  • Reduced operating costs
  • Increased productivity
  • Reduce employee’s workload to spend more time on higher value tasks
  • Get more done in less time! 

What Processes are Right for Automation? 

One of the challenges facing many organisations is deciding which processes are good for automation and which process to choose to automate first. This line from Bill Gates offers some good advice; 

automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency” 

It follows therefore, that the first step in any automation journey is reviewing all of your business processes to ensure that they are all running as efficiently as possible.  You do not want to waste time, money and effort in implementing a robot to carry an inefficient process which will reap no rewards at all.  

Another challenge is choosing which process to automate first. In our experience, many clients have earmarked one of their most painful processes as process number one in order to heal the pain.  This fails more often than not because the most painful process is often one of the most difficult to automate.  Ideally, you want to pick a straightforward, highly repetitive process which will be easier to automate with simple results, clearly showing the benefits to automation. Buy-in at this stage from all stakeholders is critical if RPA is be successfully deployed further in the organisation. Management need to see the efficiency saving and employees can see how the robot can help them to do their job quicker and free up their time to do more interesting work. Employee resistance and onboarding should not be underestimated. Keeping workers in the loop and reducing the perceived threat is crucial to your RPA success.  

Collaboration is Key 

Successful RPA deployment is all about understanding and collaboration which if not approached carefully could ultimately lead to the failure of the project.  RPA in one sense, is just like any other piece of software that you will implement, but in another way it’s not. Implementation involves close scrutiny of an employee’s job with the employee feeling threatened by the fact that the robot may take over and they will be left redundant in the process.   

IT and the business must work closely together to ensure that process accuracy, cost reduction, and customer satisfaction benchmarks are met during implementation.  RPA implementation success is both IT- and business-driven, with RPA governance sitting directly in the space between business and IT. Failure to maintain consistent communication between these two sides will mean that project governance will be weak and that any obstacles, such as potential integration issues of RPA with existing programs, cannot be dealt effectively. 

Don’t Underestimate Change 

Change management should not be underestimated, the implementation of RPA is a major change in an organisation which needs to be planned for, and carefully managed. Consistently working through the change management aspects is critical to making RPA successful. It is important to set realistic expectations and look at RPA from an enterprise perspective focusing on the expected results and what will be delivered. 

 RPA = Better Business Outcomes 

RPA is a valuable automation asset in a company’s digital road map and can deliver great results if implemented well. However, often RPA implementations have not delivered the returns promised, impacted by the challenges we have discussed. Implementations that give significant consideration to the design phase and realise the importance of broader change management into the process will benefit from better business outcomes across the end-to-end process. Enterprises looking to embark on the RPA journey can have chance to take note, avoid the pitfalls and experience the success that RPA can bring.