Application Performance Management (APM)  – Monitor Every Critical Swipe, Tap and Click

0

Customers expect your business application to perform consistently and reliably at all times and for good reason. Many have built their own business systems based on the reliability of your application. This reliability target is your Service Level Objective (SLO), the measurable characteristics of a Service Level Agreement (SLA) between a service provider and its customer.

The SLO sets target values and expectations on how your service(s) will perform over time. It includes Service Level Indicators (SLIs)—quantitative measures of key aspects of the level of service—which may include measurements of availability, frequency, response time, quality, throughput and so on.

If your application goes down for longer than the SLO dictates, fair warning: All hell may break loose, and you may experience frantic pages from customers trying to figure out what’s going on. Furthermore, a breach to your SLO error budget—the rate at which service level objectives can be missed—could have serious financial implications as defined in the SLA.

Developers are always eager to release new features and functionality. But these upgrades don’t always turn out as expected, and this can result in an SLO violation. Deployments and system upgrades will be needed, but anytime you make changes to applications, you introduce the potential for instability.

There are two companies currently leading the way in Business Service Monitoring, New Relic and AppDynamics. AppDynamics has been named as Gartner Magic quadrant winner in APM for the last six years. This suite of application and business performance monitoring solutions ensures that every part of even the most complex, multi-cloud environments—from software to infrastructure to business outcomes—is highly visible, optimized, and primed to drive growth. The need for such a monitoring tool can be evidenced in the large number of Tier One banks which have taken it onboard.

AppDynamics is a tool which enables you to track the numerous metrics for your SLI. You can choose which metrics to monitor, with additional tools that can deliver deeper insights into areas such as End User Monitoring, Business IQ and Browser Synthetic Monitoring.

The application can be broken down into the following components:

  • APM: Say your application relies heavily on APIs and automation. Start with a few API you want to monitor and ask, “Which one of these APIs, if it fails, will impact my application or affect revenue?”  These calls usually have a very demanding SLO.
  • End User Monitoring: EUM is the best way to truly understand the customer experience because it automatically captures key metrics, including end-user response time, network requests, crashes, errors, page load details and so on.
  • Business iQ: Monitoring your application is not just about reviewing performance data.  Biz iQ helps expose application performance from a business perspective, whether your app is generating revenue as forecasted or experiencing a high abandon rate due to degraded performance.
  • Browser Synthetic Monitoring: While EUM shows the full user experience, sometimes it’s hard to know if an issue is caused by the application or the user. Generating synthetic traffic will allow you to differentiate between the two.

There is an SRE dashboard where you can view your KPIs:

  • SLO violation duration graph, response time (99th percentile) and load for your critical API calls
  • Error rate
  • Database response time
  • End-user response time (99th percentile)
  • Requests per minute
  • Availability
  • Session duration

SLI, SLO, SLA and error budget aren’t just fancy terms. They’re critical to determining if your system is reliable, available or even useful to your users. You should be able to measure these metrics and tie them to your business objectives, as the ultimate goal of your application is to provide value to your customers.

RSS Feed Subscribe to our RSS Feed

Posted on : 30-08-2018 | By : richard.gale | In : App, Consumer behaviour, Innovation

Tags: ,

Write a comment