2017 – A great year for the hackers

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This year saw some of the biggest data breaches so far, we saw cover-ups exposed and ransoms reaching new highs.

Of course, it’s no secret that when it comes to cybersecurity this was a pretty bad year and I’m certain that there are many CIO’s, CISO’s and CTO’s and indeed CEO’s wondering what 2018 has to offer from the hackers.

That 2018 threat landscape is sure to be full of yet more sophisticated security attacks on the horizon. However, the big win for 2017 is that people have woken up to the threat, “not if, but when” has been finally been acknowledged and people are becoming as proactive and creative as the attackers to protect their companies. The old adage of “offence is the best form of defence” still rings true.

With that in mind we’re going to look back at some of what 2017 had to offer, the past may not predict the future, but it certainly gives you a good place to start your planning for it.

So let’s take a look at some of the most high profile data breaches of 2017.

Equifax (you guessed it) – No doubt you’ll have heard of this breach and because of its huge scale its very likely that if you weren’t directly affected yourself, you’ll know someone who was. This breach was and still is being highly published and for good reason. A plethora of litigation and investigations followed the breach in an effort to deal with the colossal scale of personal information stolen. This includes over 240 individual class-action lawsuits, an investigation opened by the Federal Trade Commission, and more than 60 government investigations from U.S. state attorneys general, federal agencies and the British and Canadian governments. More recently a rare 50-state class-action suit has been served on the company.

Here are some of the facts:

  • 145.5 million people (the figure recently revised by Equifax, now 2.5 million more than it initially reported) as its estimate for the number of people potentially affected.
  • U.K. consumers unknown. Equifax said it is still determining the extent of the breach for U.K. consumers.
  • 8,000 potential Canadian victims (recently revised down from 100,000).
  • High profile Snr leaders to leave since the breach. Former CEO Richard Smith retired (Smith is reported to have banked a $90 million retirement golden handshake), the chief information officer and chief security officer have also “left”.
  • There are an unknown number of internal investigations taking place against board members (including its chief financial officer and general counsel), for selling stock after the breach’s discovery, but before its public disclosure.
  • The breach lasted from mid-May through July.
  • The hackers accessed people’s names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver’s license numbers.
  • They also stole credit card numbers for about 209,000 people and dispute documents with personal identifying information for about 182,000 people

Uber – The big story here wasn’t so much the actual breach, but the attempt to cover it up. The breach itself actually happened 2016. The hackers stole the personal data of 57 million Uber customers, and the Uber paid them $100,000 to cover it up. However, the incident wasn’t revealed to the public until this November, when the breach was made known by the new Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi.

Uber has felt the impact of the backlash for the cover-up globally and on varying scales. From the big guns in the US where three senators in the US introduced a bill that could make executives face jail time for knowingly covering up data breaches. Right through to the city of York in the UK where the city voted against renewing Uber’s licence on December 23 due to concerns about the data breach.

Deloitte – According to a report from the Guardian in September earlier this year, a Deloitte global email server was breached, giving the attackers access to emails to and from the company’s staff, not to mention customer information on some of the company’s most high-profile public and private sector clients. Although the breach was discovered in March 2017, it is thought that the hackers had been in the company’s systems since October or November 2016. During in this period, the hackers could have had access to information such as usernames, passwords, IP addresses and architectural design diagrams. Deloitte confirmed the breach, saying that the hack had taken place through an admin account and that only a few clients were impacted by the attack

Now if I covered even half of the high profile cyber-attack cases in detail this article would look more like a novel. Plus, as much as I love to spend my time delighting you my dear readers it is Christmas, which means I have bad tv to watch, family arguments to take part in and copious amounts of calories (alcohol) to consume and feel guilty about for the next 3 months. So, with that in mind let’s do a short recap of some of the other massive exploits and data breaches this past year:

  1. Wonga, the payday loan firm suffered a data breach which may have affected up to 245,000 customers in the UK.
  2. WannaCry and Bad Rabbit, these massive ransomware attack affected millions of computers around the world including the NHS.
  3. The NSA was breached by a group called The Shadow Brokers. They stole and leaked around 100GB of confidential information and hacking tools.
  4. WikiLeaks Vault 7 leak, WikiLeaks exposed the CIA’s secret documentation and user guides for hacking tools which targeting the Mac and Linux operating systems.
  5. Due to a vulnerability, Cloudflare unwittingly leaked customer data from Uber, OKCupid and 1Password.
  6. Bell Canada was threatened by hackers with the leak of 9 million customer records. When the company refused to pay, some of the information was published online.
  7. Other hacks include Verizon, Yahoo, and Virgin America, Instagram…it goes on.

So, all in all not a great year but looking on the bright side if you weren’t on the wrong end of a cyber-attack this year or even if you were, there are plenty of lessons that can be learnt from the attacks that took place and some easy wins you can get by doing the basics right. We’ll be exploring some of these with our newsletter in 2018 and delving into the timelines of some of the more high-profile attacks that took place to help our readers understand and deal with the attack if they’re ever unfortunate enough to be in that situation. But if you can’t wait that long and want some advice now please feel free to get in touch anytime

 

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Posted on : 29-12-2017 | By : Tom Loxley | In : Cloud, compliance, Cyber Security, Data, data security, FinTech, GDPR, Uncategorized

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